Our Lab

 

Zev Gartner

Associate Professor
Office: GH-N512E
Phone: 415-514-9962
email: zev.gartner (at) ucsf.edu




About Me

Current Position: Associate Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, UCSF
Postdoctoral: UC Berkeley (mentor: Professor Carolyn Bertozzi)
Graduate: Harvard University (mentor: Professor David R Liu)
Undergraduate: UC Berkeley (mentor: Professor Yeon-Kyun Shin)
K-12: Santa Cruz, California

My Research Interests

My laboratory is working to understand how cells assemble into multicellular tissues, how the structure of tissues controls the behavior of individual cells, and how changes to tissue structure drive the progression of diseases like cancer. Toward these goals, we build, perturb, and model human tissues in vitro using techniques from the chemical, engineering, physical and biological sciences.

Andrew Bremer

Bioengineering Graduate Student
Co-advisor: David Schaffer (UC Berkeley)
Office: GH-N546
Phone: 415-476-6251
email: awbremer (at) berkeley.edu

About Me

My Research

Max Coyle

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Scientist
Office: GH-N544
Phone: 415-476-6251
email: maxwell.coyle (at) ucsf.edu

About Me

Having been both born and raised in Seattle, WA, I drove an old Volvo south to Pomona College in Claremont, CA, where I spent at least some of my time studying the role of small RNAs in regulating bacterial metabolism. I emerged four years later with a BA in Molecular Biology under the tutelage of Dr. Jane Liu. Having suffered both the relentless melancholy of Seattle rain and the relentless colic of Southern California sunshine, I am exploring comfortable moderation in the San Francisco climate while I meddle with science in the Gartner Lab.

My Research

Jim Garbe

Researcher
Office: GH-N544
Phone: 415-476-6251

About Me

I grew up on a farm in the corn belt west of Chicago and earned my undergraduate degree in biology at Northern Illinois University. After a short stint as a high school science teacher I returned to graduate school and received my Ph.D in biology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. I did post-graduate work at the University of California, Berkeley and have been a scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory since 1994.

My Research

My research focuses on normal human mammary epithelial cells and the intrinsic and extrinsic changes that lead to immortal and malignant transformation. This has included introducing defined genetic changes into normal HMEC to create new cell lines. In the Gartner lab I will use DNA directed assembly to examine how different cell types and altered cell functions affect breast cancer related processes.

Alex Hughes

Postdoc

Jane Coffin Childs Postdoctoral Fellow
Office: GH-N542
Phone: 415-476-6251
email: Alex.Hughes (at) ucsf.edu

About Me

I grew up in Auckland, New Zealand and attended college there, studying chemical engineering and pharmacology. I then relocated to Berkeley, California and studied bioengineering under Professor Amy Herr, developing several innovative microscale proteomics (e.g. western blotting) methods to analyze limiting biological samples down to the single-cell level to both diagnostic and basic research ends. At Auckland and Berkeley, I developed an interest in the interplay between cell collective behavior and tissue and organism-level development, leading me to pursue a postdoc in the Gartner Lab.

My Research

I study the early growth and development of mammary epithelial tissues by building and applying precision engineering approaches to tissue assembly in 3D culture systems. I am interested in bringing a systems-level approach to understanding the interplay between tissue-level organization and the physical properties of individual cells (e.g. motility and adhesion of cells to other cells and to the extracellular matrix). I am tackling this problem by perturbing and assembling single cells and tracking subsequent tissue organization in real-time to determine the "design rules" for tissue assembly and function.

Chithra Krishnamurthy

Postdoc
Office: GH-N542
Phone: 415-476-6251
email:

About Me

My Research

Samantha Liang

Tetrad Graduate Student
Office: GH-N542
Phone: 415-476-6251
email: samantha.liang (at) ucsf.edu

About Me

I am currently a graduate student in the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program. As an undergraduate, I majored in Bioengineering at UC Berkeley, where I did research in the field of Synthetic Biology.

My Research

I am interested in using chemical strategies to make protein therapeutics more specific and effective. I hope to combine tools of structural DNA nanotechnology and protein engineering to combinatorially explore new bispecific therapeutics. My other research interests include developing new techniques for cell labeling and assembly, as well as understanding and engineering cell signaling networks.

Amanda Paulson

Biomedical Sciences Graduate Student

NSF Graduate Research Fellow
Office: GH-N542
Phone: 415-476-6251
email: amanda.paulson (at) ucsf.edu

About Me

I was born and raised in the 'burbs of Detroit, and went on to college at the University of Michigan. There I got started in breast cancer research in the laboratory of Dr. Max Wicha. Before graduate school, I spent two years in Grand Rapids working in Dr. George Vande Woude's lab. In my free time I enjoy running & craft beer.

My Research

I'm interested in defining the role of heterogeneity in cellular communities. I am utilizing programmed assembly methods developed by the Gartner lab to determine whether signaling heterogeneity between cells can be beneficial to the function of the tissue as a whole.

Kade Southard

CCB Graduate Student
Office: GH-N542
Phone: 415-476-6251
email: Kade.Southard (at) ucsf.edu

About Me

Born and raised in Massachusetts I stuck to the east coast for my undergraduate education, majoring in chemistry at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, NY. While there, I gained an interest in chemical biology. Currently, I am a graduate student the Chemistry and Chemical Biology program here at UCSF.

My Research

I am interested in how spatial heterogeneity in the activation of cell surface receptors affects cell fate decisions. Specifically, I am applying new nanoparticle probes to observe and perturb the location of activated receptors in collaboration with Professor Young-Wook Jun's lab.

Rob Weber

CCB Graduate Student
Office: GH-N542
Phone: 415-476-6251
email: robert.weber (at) ucsf.edu

About Me

I grew up in Southern California before attending UC Santa Cruz where I earned a B.S. in chemistry and molecular biology with highest honors. While there, I studied chemical biology under professor R. Scott Lokey, specifically working on Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis (SPPS) techniques and non-estrogen receptor targets of tamoxifen. I then worked as a senior research associate for Pacific Biosciences for two years, developing novel organic fluorophores for their next generation sequencing platform. Currently I am an MD/PhD student working in the chemistry and chemical biology department of UCSF.

My Research

I am interested in understanding the responses of in vitro tissues to hormones.

Jennifer Hu

Bioengineering Graduate Student

NSF Graduate Research Fellow
Office: GH-N544
Phone: 415-476-6251
email: JenniferHu (at) Berkeley.edu

About Me

I grew up in northeast Ohio, and graduated in 2010 from Copley High School. While completing my S.B. at Harvard University, I started doing research in the labs of Debra Auguste and David Mooney. Thanks to them, as well as my lab mentors Marjan Rafat and Steve Kennedy, I decided to pursue a PhD! Now I'm a student in the UC Berkeley-UCSF Graduate Program in Bioengineering, where I joined the Gartner lab in 2015. When I have free time, I enjoy board games, baking, rock climbing, ballet, and hang gliding!

My Research

I am interested in using in vitro tissues to study how cells establish and maintain tissue structure.

Katelyn Cabral

Bioengineering Graduate Student
Office: GH-N544
Phone: 415-476-6251
email: kcabral (at) berkeley.edu




About Me

I grew up in the town of Swansea, Massachusetts, where I spent my time reading, acting in plays, and dressing up in colonial outfits to teach local history. Drawn in by the ideas of creating synthetic organs in the lab, I attended Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) to get my B.S. in Biomedical Engineering. As I did my first research projects on skin tissue engineering in the lab of Dr. George Pins, I quickly realized that the human body is incredibly complex, and that more biology needs to be understood in order to get synthetic organs that actually function like real ones. Undeterred, I joined the UC Berkeley/UCSF joint graduate Ph.D. program in Bioengineering. Here in the Gartner lab, I am trying to figure out the basic science of how cells form tissues, so that I can order a new liver or kidney from a catalog when I'm old.

My Research Interests

I'm interested in understanding how the processes of angiogenesis and morphogenesis are affected by the spatial, mechanical, chemical, and hemodynamic cues that endothelial cells experience.

David Patterson

Postdoctoral Fellow
Office: GH-N544
Phone: 415-476-6251
email: David.Patterson (at) UCSF.edu




About Me

I was born and raised in central Pennsylvania. I earned my BA in Chemistry at Franklin and Marshall College near historic downtown Lancaster (yes there are lots of Amish). Working with Professor Ed Fenlon, I made progress on the synthesis of the molecular trefoil knots. After college, I worked for two years at DuPont's Experimental Station in Delaware before attending graduate school at the University of California, Irvine. During my PhD under the mentorship of Professor Jennifer Prescher, I developed new bioorthogonal (i.e., biocompatible) chemistries for studying biomolecules on live cells. I am extremely active outside the lab as well, enjoying Ultimate, soccer, hiking, kayaking, kickboxing, and pretty much anything else.

My Research Interests

I am working on two fronts in the lab: trying to improve the reliability and throughput of cell patterning and studying signal transduction of cell surface receptors.

Lyndsay Murrow

Damon Runyon Postdoctoral Fellow
Office: GH-N544
Phone: 415-476-6251
email: Lyndsay.Murrow (at) UCSF.edu

About Me

After growing up in the Chicago suburbs, I made my way to the west coast to study chemical engineering at Stanford. Following graduation, I spent two years as a postbac at the NCI, studying potential therapeutic targets for triple-negative breast cancer. I returned to the bay area for my PhD and joined the Biomedical Sciences graduate program at UCSF. In Jay Debnath's lab, I studied mechanisms that control basal autophagy, and how a specific component of this pathway engages other intracellular trafficking pathways at the biochemical level to regulate cellular homeostasis.

My Research

Building on my previous work exploring mechanisms of cellular homeostasis, I am interested in using a bottom-up approach to interrogate mechanisms of tissue homeostasis. The goal of my research is to determine whether the physical properties that drive tissue self-organization allow stem cells to sense and respond to global tissue needs. I am using the mammary gland as a model system, computational modeling, and programmed assembly methods developed in the Gartner lab to explore how stem cell fate decisions are coordinated with the overall needs of a tissue to maintain homeostasis.

Former Gartner Lab Members

Graduate Students


Justin Farlow - cofounder @ Serotiny
Jennifer Liu - postdoc @ Hebrook Lab (UCSF)
Alec Cerchiari - scientist @ Cook Medical >
Noel Jee - Life Science Specialist @ LEK
Michael Todhunter - postdoc @ Labarge Lab (LBNL)

Postdocs


Kyle Broaders - Assistant Professor of Chemistry @ Mount Holyoke

Scientists


Nick Selden - medical student @ UCSF
Matthias Lachner - @ VFI
Melanie Bocanegra - assistant dean @ Stanford